North Carolina state quick facts
    North Carolina Facts
    State of North Carolina
    Nickname Tar Heel State
    Capital Raleigh
    Largest city Charlotte
    Population 10.2M (Rank:9)

    North Carolina facts




    How did North Carolina get its name?
    North Carolina is named after King Charles I of England ('Carolus' is the Latin word for Charles) Charles II of England granted a charter to start a colony and named it in honor of his father, Charles I

    North Carolina facts


    Largest producer of tobacco
    North Carolina is the largest producer of tobacco, furniture, brick and textiles in the U.S.

    North Carolina state facts

    Lost colony
    The first English colony on the North American continent was founded by Sir Walter Raleigh on Roanoke Island. The colony mysteriously vanished. The only clue was the word "CROATOAN" carved into a post of the fence around the village, and the letters C-R-O carved into a nearby tree.

    Facts about North Carolina


    First flight
    The Wright brothers successfully tested the first controlled heavier-than-air flight of a mechanically propelled fixed-wing airplane near Kill Devil Hills, about four miles south of Kitty Hawk, North Carolina on December 17, 1903. The Flyer I's first flight lasted 12 seconds for a total distance of 120 ft (36.5 m)

    North Carolina facts



    Oldest state univ
    The University of North Carolina (UNC) at Chapel Hill is the oldest state university in the United States. The North Carolina legislature chartered the University of North Carolina in 1789, and construction on the campus in Chapel Hill began in 1793. The University became the first public institution of higher learning in the United States to admit the students in 1795. UNC was the only public institution to confer degrees in the 18th century. (University of Georgia started admitting students in 1801 and its first graduation was held in 1804)

    Facts about North Carolina state


    First English child
    On August 18, 1587, the first English child born in America to English parents, Virginia Dare, was born on Roanoke Island, North Carolina. Dare County, the easternmost county in North Carolin, is named after her.

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    First gold rush
    Cabarrus County, North Carolina, was the site of America's first gold rush. The first gold nugget found in the United States was found at Reed Mine in Cabarrus County, North Carolina in 1799. North Carolina was the United States' biggest source of gold before California became a US territory.

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    Largest house
    The Biltmore Estate in Asheville is the largest private house in the United States, with 250 rooms. It was built by George Washington Vanderbilt II in the 19th century.

    North Carolina facts


    Tallest lighthouse
    The Cape Hatteras Lighthouse is the tallest lighthouse in the United States.

    North Carolina facts



    Birthplace of America
    North Carolina was the first colony to declare independence from the British. The Mecklenburg Declaration, supposedly signed on May 20, 1775, in Charlotte, North Carolina, declared independence from Great Britain. On April 12, 1776, the colony became the first to instruct its delegates to the Continental Congress to vote for independence from the British Crown, through the Halifax Resolves passed by the North Carolina Provincial Congress.

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    Gem of a state
    North Carolina is the only state that has produced all four types of major gemstones - diamonds, rubies, emeralds, and sapphires.

    North Carolina facts

    Birthplace of Pepsi
    Pepsi, developed in 1893 by Caleb Bradham and introduced as Brad's Drink in New Bern, North Carolina, was named after the digestive enzyme pepsin and kola nuts used in the recipe.

    North Carolina facts

    Whistler's Mother
    Arrangement in Grey and Black No.1, best known under its colloquial name Whistler's Mother, is a painting by the American-born painter James McNeill Whistler. The subject of the painting, Whistler's mother Anna McNeill Whistler, was born in Wilmington, North Carolina. The painting is housed in the Musée d'Orsay, Paris, France.

    North Carolina state facts

    Home to 'Mother Vine'
    The grape vine that could've provided fruits for Sir Walter Raleigh's colonists in 1580s, the 400-year-old scuppernong "Mother Vine", is growing on Roanoke Island, North Carolina. It is reputed to be the oldest cultivated grapevine in the world.

    North Carolina facts


    Three capitals
    New Bern, North Carolina served as the capital of the North Carolina colonial government, then briefly as the state capital. The second state capital of North Carolina was Fayetteville.
    Fayetteville hosted the North Carolina Constitutional Convention where on November 21st, 1789, the Constitution was signed.
    Raleigh was chosen as the site of the permanent capital in 1788, as its central location protected it from attacks by the British. Officially established in 1792 as both county seat and state capital, the city was named for Sir Walter Raleigh, sponsor of Roanoke, the "lost colony" on Roanoke Island.
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    North Carolina facts